Articles

The Ideal Skeet Shooter with Danka Bartekova [SVK]

August 17, 2019


When we shoot, you actually have to stand
on your legs and then you have to move a little. It’s very small movements, but you feel
the tension. Then you us your back because you are rotating
and of course you use both hands, because you hold a weapon in it. Well the muscle memory technique and reaction
are a huge part of our performance, because you have to react immediately.
You have to have a really good technique, but the muscles remember what you have to do. So you have about half a second to hit the
targets, soon as it appears. So it’s the combination of the three of them. Well eyes are quite important for shooters,
let’s say because it’s very important so that the eyes can focus at the target and you have a very good peripheral vision, because you have to be oriented in the space at the shooting range. The best position for us before shooting is
of course to, when we make sure that the weapon is on a perfect position in relation to your eye.
You have to see the eyes. You have to see the sights and of course you cannot see the barrel. So you mount as precisely as possible,
in let’s say in a couple of tenth of a second, which is a movement like this. And you have to make sure before you call for a target that actually you are prepared for the position. Actually breathing is very important. I would say it’s a vital part of the routine, because once you breathe. Breathe in, breathe out you can feel a little bit more relaxed. And that’s what you really need before you call for a target. So it’s actually very important that you
breathe very slowly and I call for a target with the breathe out, so then I just breathe
out easy. And if I’m out of my breath it is a problem,
but then I try very short breaths before I get the target. Actually once you call for a target you have
up to three seconds until it appears and once it appears, you shoot it in let’s say, in
half a second So you have like 500 milliseconds until you
hit the target, so you have to move, you have to mount and you have shoot. And it’s really, really quick when you consider
the target flies at like 80 kilometres per hour. As the competition goes on the whole body
gets of course tired but the muscles which are a little bit more tense are of course
the back, because we do rotation and of course the hands as they lift the weapon. It doesn’t appear that heavy, but its four
and a half kilos and when you have a competition and when you dry fire, you actually lift it
over 200 times, so it’s really, really tiring on the muscles. I can do 250 shots in a training or maybe
let’s say 300 shots and I still feel fine because there is the muscle memory and the hands are used to these movements and the weight. Shooting is not a sport where you compete with others. Shooting is a sport where you compete with yourself because you strive for the best performance. Actually that’s the result that counts and it’s your result that counts at the end, not the result of the opponents.

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