Lake Country Mountaineers; Perham, MN
Articles Blog

Lake Country Mountaineers; Perham, MN

August 18, 2019


(soft guitar music) – [Voiceover] The Lake Country
Mountaineer’s Black Powder Club gathers in Perham,
Minnesota each year to celebrate the history
of the fur trade era. Here, you can find
a first-hand look at how pioneers would
have lived, dressed, and worked to
survive the hardships of life in the
wilds of Minnesota. (soft guitar music) (gun shot) (metal hammering) (canon shot) – Right now, we’re at Perham,
at their pioneer grounds, I belong and am president of the Lake Country Mountaineer’s
Black Powder Club. It is a reenactment
type situation where we’re reenacting
the fur trade rendezvous era pre-1840. – In the 1840s, well, back
then, that’s when the furs were plentiful and they were
worth lots of money back then. If you got 20 dollars for a
hide, that was a lot of money. And back then, they didn’t
really have money anyway, they just traded goods for it, unless they took
them into a fur buyer where they actually
bought the furs, and they do that once a year.
That’s what the rendezvous is, so once a year all
the fur traders met and they distinguished
everything out from that point. – In today’s world,
you can’t imagine what they went through.
The life they had to lead, the dangers, and the hardship. To me, that’s the most
interesting part of it. We have both modern
and primitive camping. Modern people can come
and stay in, what we call, “tin teepees” or their campers or regular modern
nylon type tents. And then the primitive ones,
we try to keep it looking as much as possible pre-1840. – Well, our camp is
called Camp Cotton, because of the dog back
there. Her name’s Cotton. We bring our canvas tents,
bring our cast-irons, bring our boxes that’s got
our trinkets and our clothing. Most some come by here,
they look at the dog house, so the dog house is
a catcher for them. (soft guitar music) (gun shot) – It’s something
that families have hosted together for
years. Moms and dads bring their kids, and
kids start from early on, they start throwing hawk
and knife, and archery, and then when they get to a
certain age, then they can have a firearm on the
range under supervision. (gun shots) – There’s a lot of
shooting going on today. Right now they’re
having the paper shoots and the primitive range. Primitive shoots, you
get a five-round shoot. Primitive is like
your flintlocks, your percussion caps. The flintlock, you gotta
put powder in your prism and close the prism,
and cock the hammer. It’s got a flint on
the hammer, so when it hits the prism,
it lights the powder. For a percussion,
you got a little cap you stick on your
percussion and that’s what sets off your
powder and your gun. The ones that we shoot
have rifling in them. That’s like one twist
every 48 inches, so every four feet, you get
one twist in your rifling. – We have a special
shoot at this rendezvous where you can win a
gold ring that was cast much similar to the way they
did it back in those years. So that’s a fun thing, because
you get out on the range and you get some people
out there shooting, and you can have fun
with them on the range. (soft guitar music) (gun shots) (soft guitar music) – Our club has been around
for roughly about 32 years. It’s a coordinated effort,
everybody pitches in, everybody works to
get the grounds ready. It’s a team effort,
it’s a lot of work. It’s all about learning and
having fun at the same time. We are always looking
for new members. We have a website called
Lake Country Mountaineers, or you can get a hold
of any of the members if you’re at a rendezvous
or know somebody or have an interest in black powder
shooting and competition. I’ve been involved
with this club for slightly more than 20 years. So if you look at the color
of my mustache and hair, you can tell that we’re
looking for younger people. – [Voiceover] Prairie
Mosaic is funded by the Minnesota Arts and
Cultural Heritage Fund with money from the vote
of the people of Minnesota on November 4, 2008, the North Dakota
Council on the Arts, and by the members
of Prairie Public.

Only registered users can comment.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *